Iroko Wood Lumber

Iroko Wood Lumber – Iroko heartwood is usually yellow to golden or medium brown, its color tends to darken over time. Pale yellow sapwood is clearly demarcated from the heartwood. Iroko is used in boatbuilding, domestic flooring, furniture, veneer and cabinetwork. Iroko is very dense, durable and is resistant to both rot and insect attack. Workability: Iroko Wood Lumber is easy to work, except for its interlocked grain, which may cause some tearout during surfacing operations. Deposits of calcium carbonate are sometimes present, which can have a significant dulling effect on cutters. Iroko glues and finishes well. Looking for wood…

Jatoba Wood Lumber

Jatoba Wood Lumber – also known as Brazilian Cherry in the hardwood flooring industry. It has no relation to domestic Cherry, except for its natural color resembling the commonly stained color of domestic Cherry on furniture. Jatoba varies from a light orangish-brown to a darker reddish-brown, sometimes with contrasting darker grayish-brown streaks. Its color tends to darken upon exposure to light. Jatoba is used in flooring, furniture, cabinetry, tool handles, shipbuilding, railroad ties, turned objects and small specialty items. Jatoba is very durable regarding rot resistance and is resistant to insects. Workability: Jatoba Wood Lumber is also known as Brazilian…

Mahogany Wood Lumber

Mahogany Wood Lumber – Mahogany heartwood color can vary from a pale pinkish-brown to a darker reddish-brown and tends to darken with age. Mahogany also exhibits an optical effect known as chatoyancy, in which a band of reflected light, known as a “cat’s-eye,” moves just beneath the surface (Tiger’s-eye is a well-known gemstone that exhibit this phenomenon). Mahogany is used for furniture, cabinetry, turned objects, veneers, musical instruments, boatbuilding, and carving. Mahogany is durable to very durable in rot resistance and is resistant to termites, but vulnerable to other insects. Workability: Mahogany Wood Lumber is very easy to work with…

Maple Wood Lumber

Maple Wood – Maple is a family of wood with various grain and color variations, but generally similar properties. Hard Maple wood lumber is usually from the Sugar Maple, the tree tapped for maple syrup. Hard Maple wood is stronger, stiffer, harder, and denser than all the other species of Maple wood commercially available. Hard Maple is commonly used for flooring on basketball courts, dancefloors and bowling alleys. It is used in musical instruments, cutting boards, butcher blocks, workbenches, baseball bats, and many turned objects and specialty wood items. Maple is rated as non-durable to perishable and is susceptible to…

Merbau Wood Lumber

Merbau Wood Lumber – Merbau wood has an orangish-brown color when freshly cut, but ages to a dark reddish-brown. Color variation between boards can be high. Small yellow mineral deposits are found throughout the wood, making it easy to separate from other woods. These yellow deposits are water-soluble and may cause staining when wetted. Merbau is strong and durable and resists both rotting and insect attack. Common uses include flooring, furniture, musical instruments, turned objects, and specialty wood items. Workability: Merbau Wood Lumber wood glues and finishes well, though it can be difficult to saw due to gumming and dulling…

Padauk Wood Lumber

Padauk Wood Lumber – Padauk heartwood color ranges from a pale pinkish-orange to a deep brownish-red. Padauk wood is reddish-orange when freshly cut, darkening substantially over time to a reddish or purplish-brown, lighter color pieces may age to a grayish-brown. Padauk wood lumber is used in fine joinery, fancy turnery, carvings, flooring, decorative veneer, tool and knife handles. Padauk has excellent decay resistance and is resistant to termites and other insects. Workability: Padauk Wood Lumber is generally easy to work, though tearout may occur during planing on quartersawn or interlocked grain pieces. Padauk turns, glues, and finishes well. Looking for…

Poplar Wood Lumber

Poplar Wood Lumber – Poplar wood is seldom used for its appearance, it is most commonly used for pallets, crates, upholstered furniture frames, and plywood. Poplar wood veneer is used for a variety of applications, dyed in various colors, or on the hidden undersides of veneered panels of other more decorative woods. Poplar wood is considered a hardwood by species, but is typically softer than pine, a common softwood. Poplar is moderately durable to non-durable and is susceptible to insect attack. Workability: Poplar Wood Lumber is very easy to work in almost all regards, its only downside is its softness.…

Purpleheart Wood Lumber

Purpleheart Wood Lumber – When freshly cut, Purpleheart is a dull grayish-purplish-brown. With drying and exposure, the wood becomes a deep eggplant purple. With further age and exposure to light, the wood becomes a dark brown with a hint of purple. This color-shift can be slowed and minimized by using a UV inhibiting finish. Purpleheart wood is used in turnery, cabinets, fine furniture, flooring, tool handles, heavy construction and shipbuilding. Purpleheart is very durable and resists both decay and most insects. Workability: Purpleheart Wood Lumber can present some unique challenges. If worked with dull tools, or if cutter speeds are too…

Red Oak Lumber

Red Oak Wood – Red Oak Lumber is one of the most popular hardwoods in the USA for cabinet and furniture making. Its heartwood is a light to medium brown, often with a reddish cast. Its nearly white to light brown sapwood is not always sharply demarcated from the heartwood, and quarter-sawn sections display prominent ray-fleck patterns. Red Oak is rated as non-durable to perishable, with a poor insect resistance. It stains when in contact with water, particularly along its porous growth ring areas. Workability: Red Oak Lumber is easy to work with hand and machine tools, but has moderately…

Sapele Wood Lumber

Sapele Wood Lumber – Sapele heartwood is a golden to dark reddish brown and tends to darken with age. A ribbon pattern is seen on quartersawn boards, and Sapele is also known for a wide variety of other figured grain patterns, such as pommele, quilted, mottled, wavy, beeswing, and fiddleback. Sapele is used in the construction of fine furniture and cabinetwork, decorative veneers, plywood, joinery, flooring and paneling.  Sapele wood is popular for flooring and stock with a ribbon grain is typically pulled at a premium for decorative finishes. Sapele ranges from moderately to very durable in decay resistance and…